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At-Home Chemical Peel Precautions

1. Because chemical peels dissolve the upper layer of skin cells, your skin will be much more sensitive after using one. Even if you do not see any pronounced redness or peeling, it's important to use sunscreen or other forms of sun protection each time you're exposed to UV light after a peel. This includes exposure to UV rays on cloudy days or during the winter months.

2. Although our chemical peels are overall mild and suited for at-home use, they are designed to damage your skin in a controlled manner. Such damage can trigger a viral cold sore outbreak. Therefore, we do not recommend chemical peels if you have a history of cold sores from herpes.

3. Similarly, if you are immune impaired due to diabetes or cancer, undergoing radiation therapy, taking corticosteroids or don’t have a functioning spleen, we strongly advise against the use of a chemical peel. Although the damage to your skin from at-home peels is minor, your immune system plays a vital role in the repairs needed to recover from this procedure.

4. If you are prone to atypical scarring, a chemical peel is likely not for you. Pronounced and raised scars such as keloids occur more often in persons with dark skin, putting Africans, Asians and Latinos at higher risk. Additionally, skin discoloration is generally more likely to occur from chemical peels in people of these ethnicities. Although your skin color doesn't automatically exclude you from a chemical peel, we strongly recommend that you don’t begin peeling without a spot test.

5. We do not recommend using a chemical peel if you are pregnant or nursing.

6. A spot test is strongly recommended for all users to avoid potential side effects during or after peeling. Try the peel first in a less noticeable area by following the included instructions, then wait one week. If your results are normal for your patch test, you'll likely experience normal results on your face.